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Aaron Carlin

TitleAssociate Physician
InstitutionUniversity of California San Diego
DepartmentMedicine
Address9500 Gilman Drive #0640
La Jolla CA 92093
Phone858-246-3261
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    Collapse Biography 
    Collapse Education and Training
    University of California, San Diego, San DiegoFellowship & Chief Fellowship06/2015Infectious Diseases
    University of California, San Diego, San DiegoResidency06/2011Internal Medicine
    University of California, San Diego, San DiegoMD, PhD06/2009Medicine, Biomedical Sciences
    University of California, Los Angeles, Los AngelesBS/BA06/2000Microbiology & Molecular Genetics, Philosophy
    Collapse Awards and Honors
    University of California, San Diego2008Gold Humanism Honor Society
    Kiwanis Club of San Diego Foundation2008  - 2009Walter A. Zitlau Memorial Award
    University of California, San Diego2008  - 2009Department of Pediatrics Award
    University of California, San Diego2010  - 2011Excellence in Teaching Award
    UCSD2017  - 2018KL2 Career Development Award
    2017  - 2022Burroughs Wellcome Career Award for Medical Scientists

    Collapse Overview 
    Collapse Overview
    Dr. Aaron Carlin received his received his M.D. and Ph.D. at UCSD. After graduation, Dr. Carlin joined the Physician Scientist Training Program at UCSD where he completed a Residency in Internal Medicine and a Fellowship and Chief Fellowship in Infectious Diseases. He subsequently joined the UCSD Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. In addition to attending on the Solid Organ Transplant and Hematology/Oncology Infectious Disease services, Dr. Carlin conducts basic and translational research that utilizes cutting edge molecular techniques to understand the mechanisms by which leading pathogens, like Zika virus, Dengue virus and Hepatitis C virus, cause disease in humans. His approach focuses on identifying mechanisms by which anti-viral transcriptional programs are regulated in myeloid cells and how pathogenic viruses subvert host responses to cause human disease. Ultimately, Dr. Carlin aims to exploit this detailed understanding of host-viral interactions to understand how and why certain microorganisms cause human disease, develop new methods for diagnosing infectious disease and identify the best targets for new antimicrobials.


    Collapse Research 
    Collapse Research Activities and Funding
    Deciphering Human Innate Immune Responses to Zika Virus Infection
    Burroughs Wellcome Career Award for Medical ScientistsJan 1, 2018 - Jan 1, 2023
    Role: PI

    Collapse Bibliographic 
    Collapse Publications
    Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Researchers can login to make corrections and additions, or contact us for help.
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    1. Fowler AM, Tang WW, Young MP, Mamidi A, Viramontes KM, McCauley MD, Carlin AF, Schooley RT, Swanstrom J, Baric RS, Govero J, Diamond MS, Shresta S. Maternally Acquired Zika Antibodies Enhance Dengue Disease Severity in Mice. Cell Host Microbe. 2018 Nov 14; 24(5):743-750.e5. PMID: 30439343.
      View in: PubMed
    2. Carlin AF, Abeles S, Chin NA, Lin GY, Young M, Vinetz JM. Case Report: A Common Source Outbreak of Anisakidosis in the United States and Postexposure Prophylaxis of Family Collaterals. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018 Sep 17. PMID: 30226150.
      View in: PubMed
    3. Carlin AF, Vizcarra EA, Branche E, Viramontes KM, Suarez-Amaran L, Ley K, Heinz S, Benner C, Shresta S, Glass CK. Deconvolution of pro- and antiviral genomic responses in Zika virus-infected and bystander macrophages. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Sep 11. PMID: 30206152.
      View in: PubMed
    4. Carlin AF, Plummer EM, Vizcarra EA, Sheets N, Joo Y, Tang W, Day J, Greenbaum J, Glass CK, Diamond MS, Shresta S. An IRF-3-, IRF-5-, and IRF-7-Independent Pathway of Dengue Viral Resistance Utilizes IRF-1 to Stimulate Type I and II Interferon Responses. Cell Rep. 2017 Nov 07; 21(6):1600-1612. PMID: 29117564.
      View in: PubMed
    5. Naito-Matsui Y, Davies LR, Takematsu H, Chou HH, Tangvoranuntakul P, Carlin AF, Verhagen A, Heyser CJ, Yoo SW, Choudhury B, Paton JC, Paton AW, Varki NM, Schnaar RL, Varki A. Physiological Exploration of the Long Term Evolutionary Selection against Expression of N-Glycolylneuraminic Acid in the Brain. J Biol Chem. 2017 02 17; 292(7):2557-2570. PMID: 28049733.
      View in: PubMed
    6. Oishi Y, Spann NJ, Link VM, Muse ED, Strid T, Edillor C, Kolar MJ, Matsuzaka T, Hayakawa S, Tao J, Kaikkonen MU, Carlin AF, Lam MT, Manabe I, Shimano H, Saghatelian A, Glass CK. SREBP1 Contributes to Resolution of Pro-inflammatory TLR4 Signaling by Reprogramming Fatty Acid Metabolism. Cell Metab. 2017 Feb 07; 25(2):412-427. PMID: 28041958.
      View in: PubMed
    7. Carlin AF, Aristizabal P, Song Q, Wang H, Paulson MS, Stamm LM, Schooley RT, Wyles DL. Temporal dynamics of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines during sofosbuvir and ribavirin therapy for genotype 2 and 3 hepatitis C infection. Hepatology. 2015 Oct; 62(4):1047-58. PMID: 26147061; PMCID: PMC4589477 [Available on 10/01/16].
    8. Ali SR, Fong JJ, Carlin AF, Busch TD, Linden R, Angata T, Areschoug T, Parast M, Varki N, Murray J, Nizet V, Varki A. Siglec-5 and Siglec-14 are polymorphic paired receptors that modulate neutrophil and amnion signaling responses to group B Streptococcus. J Exp Med. 2014 Jun 02; 211(6):1231-42. PMID: 24799499; PMCID: PMC4042635.
    9. Muto J, Morioka Y, Yamasaki K, Kim M, Garcia A, Carlin AF, Varki A, Gallo RL. Hyaluronan digestion controls DC migration from the skin. J Clin Invest. 2014 Mar; 124(3):1309-19. PMID: 24487587; PMCID: PMC3934161.
    10. Shibata N, Carlin AF, Spann NJ, Saijo K, Morello CS, McDonald JG, Romanoski CE, Maurya MR, Kaikkonen MU, Lam MT, Crotti A, Reichart D, Fox JN, Quehenberger O, Raetz CR, Sullards MC, Murphy RC, Merrill AH, Brown HA, Dennis EA, Fahy E, Subramaniam S, Cavener DR, Spector DH, Russell DW, Glass CK. 25-Hydroxycholesterol activates the integrated stress response to reprogram transcription and translation in macrophages. J Biol Chem. 2013 Dec 13; 288(50):35812-23. PMID: 24189069; PMCID: PMC3861632.
    11. Uchiyama S, Carlin AF, Khosravi A, Weiman S, Banerjee A, Quach D, Hightower G, Mitchell TJ, Doran KS, Nizet V. The surface-anchored NanA protein promotes pneumococcal brain endothelial cell invasion. J Exp Med. 2009 Aug 31; 206(9):1845-52. PMID: 19687228; PMCID: PMC2737157.
    12. Weiman S, Dahesh S, Carlin AF, Varki A, Nizet V, Lewis AL. Genetic and biochemical modulation of sialic acid O-acetylation on group B Streptococcus: phenotypic and functional impact. Glycobiology. 2009 Nov; 19(11):1204-13. PMID: 19643844.
      View in: PubMed
    13. Carlin AF, Chang YC, Areschoug T, Lindahl G, Hurtado-Ziola N, King CC, Varki A, Nizet V. Group B Streptococcus suppression of phagocyte functions by protein-mediated engagement of human Siglec-5. J Exp Med. 2009 Aug 03; 206(8):1691-9. PMID: 19596804; PMCID: PMC2722167.
    14. Carlin AF, Uchiyama S, Chang YC, Lewis AL, Nizet V, Varki A. Molecular mimicry of host sialylated glycans allows a bacterial pathogen to engage neutrophil Siglec-9 and dampen the innate immune response. Blood. 2009 Apr 02; 113(14):3333-6. PMID: 19196661; PMCID: PMC2665898.
    15. Lewis AL, Cao H, Patel SK, Diaz S, Ryan W, Carlin AF, Thon V, Lewis WG, Varki A, Chen X, Nizet V. NeuA sialic acid O-acetylesterase activity modulates O-acetylation of capsular polysaccharide in group B Streptococcus. J Biol Chem. 2007 Sep 21; 282(38):27562-71. PMID: 17646166; PMCID: PMC2588433.
    16. Carlin AF, Lewis AL, Varki A, Nizet V. Group B streptococcal capsular sialic acids interact with siglecs (immunoglobulin-like lectins) on human leukocytes. J Bacteriol. 2007 Feb; 189(4):1231-7. PMID: 16997964; PMCID: PMC1797352.